“Keeping it Simple” is more important than ever!

A blog from Katy Scott and Phil Griffiths about the importance of keeping the message simple when learning remotely.

In January I wrote a blog post all about the simplicity of the message. In the months that have followed we have experienced a seismic shift in everything we do both in and out of the classroom. I find myself writing this ‘electronically’, ‘remotely’ in ‘unprecedented’ times.

One point that stands out when I read my January blog post back is this; ‘With all that teaching and learning noise out there we need to keep things simple.’

After some of my early Zoom lessons, I reflected on how much I seemed to be talking, how I was gesticulating wildly at the screen and how I seemed to overly use stock phrases that made me cringe when I looked back. I don’t think I was keeping it simple for my pupils. Continue Reading

Responsive Teaching

Thinking about the best way of feeding back to pupils remotely, I am reminded of Dylan William’s suggestion that formative assessment would have been better off being called ‘responsive teaching’. As teachers we are often trying to stretch feedback to fit various purposes, but surely the primary function should be to provide the teacher with information so that they can respond through their teaching. Continue Reading

Whole-Class Feedback: What does it look like? Pt 2

Part 2 of 2 from Mrs Martin on Whole-Class Feedback. If you haven’t read the first part of this blog then you can access it here

Feedback doesn’t have to take the form of a set proforma for every task. The right approach for the work you have set must come from responding to the outcomes. Working remotely is definitely different, but in many ways the process of how we respond to learning (or misunderstanding!) should remain the same.

This second blog aims to look at some other methods that might be more appropriate to different circumstances, and different contexts:

  • Whole Class Feedback Proformas
  • Annotated Examples- Pupils’ work
  • Teacher modelling or Providing Correct Answers
  • Strategies for Sixth Form

Continue Reading

Our (Simple) Literacy Policy: Revamped

A blog by Literacy CHAMPION, Katy Scott.

Distilling. It’s important. With all that teaching and learning noise out there we need to keep things simple. That’s what The Kennet Literacy Policy is – it distils what we know into black-and-white, simple sense. Continue Reading

“Are there any questions?”

…Following this year’s INSET I vowed never to say these words again. Yet, they crept back into my lessons almost immediately. Scolding myself at the start of most days since, I’m beginning to change the phrasing and structure of my questioning:

What do you understand?”

“What is the first step to this task, and what should you include?” Continue Reading